Each of us has a distinct role in our friend group. We contribute in a unique way, and that's why our friends love us. Some of the most memorable times are when the gang comes together for a holiday dinner. Although not every friend may know their way around the kitchen, each member has a role in the group that allows them to bring the best of their abilities to the dinner table.

The Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur is quickly approaching, and for many, this holiday comes with a mixture of emotions, but the food that it includes (at the end of the fast) is always worth it. That being said, it’s time for each of your friends to prepare for the most stressful, hangry, yummy, and exhausting of all of the Jewish holidays. In order to properly plan for the feast, each and every member of the group must do their part in contributing what they know best, based off of their identity within the group.

1. The Mom: Bagels and Cream Cheese

Emma Glubiak

She’s the friend who keeps everyone on track, is reasonable in every situation, and always looks out for others. After a full 25 hours of fasting, it’s crucial that she brings just the right amount of food, so that each person fully fills their tummies without overdoing it. That being said, you can most likely find this comforting member of the crew carbo-loading her friends with a smear of yummy cream cheese on top.  

2. The Adventurous Friend: Casserole

Jennifer Weintraub

The bold side of the adventurous friend is coming straight with them to the holidays. They enjoy exploring the unknown and living life to the fullest. The concoction of ingredients thrown into a casserole is their specialty, and as scared as you are to see what’s underneath the tinfoil wrap, this friend’s casserole is sure to be surprisingly delicious. 

3. The Basic Friend: Traditional Challah Bread

Priyanga Selvakumar

It’s a known fact that traditional, sweet, egg-infused challah is a must-have at every Jewish holiday. It’s simple (just like the most basic comrade of the group). This friend gets enjoyment out of the simple things in life, and she'll bring that appreciation for simplicity to the break-fast. 

4. The Hot Mess: Silverware

Elizabeth Layman

They are just as excited as you to scarf down delicious food, but just because it’s the holiday, doesn’t mean that they'll clean up their act. In this case, the hectic lifestyle of this friend may be too much for them to even follow a simple recipe. The best (and the only) thing you can expect from them is the simplest of all items — a container of silverware. 

5. The Health Nut: Fruit and Vegetable Platter

Christin Urso

They feel the light-headed pain of no food during the 25-hour fast,  yet the health nut of the group is too strong to back down from their wholesome lifestyle. After a full day of fasting, an organized, colorful array of fruits and vegetables is sure to satisfy all of their nutritional needs. Not only does this friend want to keep their own meal balanced, but they'll look out for the well-being of the group, too. 

6. The High Maintenance Friend: Smoked Salmon

Juliet Paterek

Your high maintenance friend will do everything in their power to make sure it's a top-notch break-fast. A simple bagel and cream cheese or a slice of challah bread, alone, just won't do. The addition of smoked salmon, a favorite Jewish delicacy, is the best way to add a sophisticated (and hyper-appropriate) touch to your Yom Kippur celebration.

7. The Emotional Friend: Dessert

Amanda Shulman

Fasting for an entire day has probably gotten the best of this friend, and more than likely, dessert is the only thing getting them through. Their contribution may include mandel bread, seven layer cake (aka seven layers of heaven), rugelach, or extra chocolatey babka that you just can’t resist (even if your stomach is imploding at this point). If this is your role, you should come prepared with the most indulgent part of the feast. Dessert will give you all of the feels (perfect for the emotional friend), and it's necessary in order to end your holiday on a good note. 

Whether they bring out their inner foodie or contribute non-food related items, each and every member of your crew can put their own unique spin on the holiday feast. It's important to use what you know best in order to get the most out of this 25-hour fast. If you're celebrating the holiday this Wednesday, keep in mind the strengths of your role, use them to your best ability, and contribute, to the break-fast, what makes sense for you.