Every day, millions of people come together to engage in an activity that is not only a necessity to survival but an experience: eating. In countries such as the United States where we have an overabundance of food readily available to those who need and want it, food waste is an increasing problem. Waste isn’t limited to restaurants and cafeterias that serve food, but to grocery stores and convenience markets as well. The fact of the matter is that suppliers cannot predict exactly how much people will buy or eat, therefore they often overproduce in order to maximize profits. This results in millions of pounds of food being wasted each year. This is not just scraps leftover at the bottom, but high quality meals that people spend large amounts of their income on. The Food Recovery Network was started in response to this issue at a university and has expanded across the country to help mitigate the amount of food wasted in dining halls across campus. I work with the Food Recovery Network at FSU and I can personally say that I’ve recovered hundreds of pounds of food each night that ranges from steamed vegetables to pans of fried chicken and stuffed pasta shells. We take this food to local homeless shelters which helps them out tremendously, and long-term it can help the cooks and companies realize how much they are overproducing and try to cut back on how much they cook in the future. These programs are a win-win situation for the dining halls and the homeless shelters, and even recovering from one location at one campus can make more of an impact than you can imagine.
Loading...