By now, people have had a chance to digest the results of the 2016 presidential election. Some people are content with the outcome, while many others are dissatisfied. But we cannot let this election divide us! Before you break off any lifelong friendships, there's one thing to remember: a leader does not define the entire group he represents. We are America the Great, a nation born from hardworking people who dream of living a free and happy life. We are a melting pot of different cultures.

Regardless of any racist allegations against the president elect, it's important to remember that one man does not make a country. Diversity is something Americans take for granted everyday. Imagine living in a country, like Sweden or South Korea, where diversity is not prevalent. Citizens in these ethnically homogeneous countries can read about different cultures and traditions, but cannot drive 15 minutes to Chinatown, for example, and experience it for themselves.

Diversity is something to be celebrated, and there is no better way to unite and celebrate our diversity than with food! Here is a list of dishes from other countries that America has taken in and made its own. 

Burger

Krizza Santucci

Nothing screams AMERICA like a grilled beef patty, amirite?? Actually, the burger originated in Germany, then traveled to America as a seasoned hunk of meat. Finally, some unsung hero put it between two buns, and gave us the ultimate backyard BBQ, 4th of July dish.

Sushi

Victoria Bak

Sushi, like this election, is a polarizing topic. People either love it or gag at the thought. It has, however, become a staple dish for many Americans. Sushi originated in Southeast Asia around the 8th century.

Raw fish was wrapped in cooked rice as a method of fish fermentation, until someone decided to eat it all together. Today, Americans enjoy countless forms and varieties of sushi, including the Sushirrito, or Sushi Burrito.

Anything from a Halal Cart 

Victoria Bak

The Arabic word 'Halal' means permissible. Halal food must be prepared according to the guidelines of Islamic Law. Whether or not you're a practicing Muslim, we can all agree that the care which goes into these dishes results in dynamic flavor, and an all-around satisfying meal. Not to mention, the guys in the aluminum Halal cart are amazing. They're generous with the hot sauce and are genuinely interested in knowing how your day is going! 

Burritos

Annie Slabotsky

The word burrito means "little donkey" in Spanish. That little donkey crossed over the Mexican border (pre-wall) to enhance this great nation with meat and refried beans. Today, the burrito has become so much more. Burritos here are bursting at the seams with the traditional beans and meat, as well as cheese, veggies, rice, sauces, and guac. In America, we might call this the "Fat Donkey."

Chinese Food

Victoria Bak

With the influx of Chinese immigrants in the 1800s came the introduction of their delicious cuisine. Back then, it was prepared slightly different from how we enjoy it today (with WAY less sugar and salt), but it was loved nonetheless. Chinese food became truly Americanized in the 1920s, but did not reach popularity until after World War II. 

The great General Tso isn't directly responsible for this recipe, but someone somewhere decided to give him credit. And while we're giving credit where credit is due, I'd like to thank the woman at the mall food court who forces free samples down my throat, as well as Suki, my friendly neighborhood Chinese Food vendor. She is open at all hours of the night and has helped me through some tough (drunk) times.

Vodka

Abigail Wilkins

In the Middle Ages, vodka was used mainly for medicinal purposes. It became the national drink of Russia in the 14th century, and of Poland in the 16th century. Many Europeans today drink it straight, but Americans use vodka to create delicious drinks (i.e. the Bloody Mary, Martini, or Moscow Mule.)

If you're having a hard time accepting the results of this election, ease the pain with some vodka. Likewise, if the election went the way you hoped it would, take a victory shot!

Just like these foods have adapted to become an essential stitch in our national fabric, so too can we all adapt to any perceived adversities, peacefully come together, and create a delicious and united American dish.  By reading this list, you are now prepared to throw a multi-cultural party and properly celebrate American diversity!