Every type of wine has a distinct personality and flavor that makes it unique. Similar to picking your major in college, your choice of wine can say a lot about your personal characteristics and preferences. Here's the type of wine you should try according to your college major (after you finish studying of course). 

1. History: Moscato

moscato

thepinkpeppercorn on Flickr

History buffs likely know that wine has been around since 4000 BC. Recently, archeologists discovered the oldest winery in Armenia dating back 6,000 years. Embody the rich history of wine-making by sipping on a glass of Moscato, which is made from muscat grapes that have origins in Ancient Greece. 

2. Economics: Sauvignon Blanc

Theresa Harvey

Move over France, The Wine Economist reports that New Zealand profits the most from wine production, particularly from a single grape variety: sauvignon blanc from the Marlborough region. Lucky for us, you can typically find a vintage from New Zealand at a reasonable price at your local liquor store.

3. Pre-Med/ Health Professions: Pinot Noir

Theresa Harvey

Practice what you preach? Experts suggest that red wines are the healthiest variety of wine because they contain a greater amount tannins—a chemical compound found in grape skins that is known to have a great amount of antioxidants. 

4. Theater: Sherry 

Theresa Harvey

 "Good wine is a good familiar creature, if it be well used." - William Shakespeare

Wine was an expensive luxury during the time of Shakespeare, the father of English drama. Elizabethans most likely would have consumed "sack" wine, which today is called sherry: a sweet fortified wine from Spain. 

5. Music: Zinfandel 

@rosenblumcellars RC 12. A 2010 #zinfandel #wine 🍷 cheers!

Dana Moos on Flickr

Studies have found that listening to music while tasting wine can actually make you like it more. Why not test out this theory by sipping on a glass of zinfandel, one the sweetest varieties of white wine?

6. Environmental Studies: Riesling

Theresa Harvey

Move over red and white, studies have found that "green" wine produced by eco-friendly biodynamic wineries actually tastes better than it's non-organic counterparts. Recently, New York wineries have been gaining momentum in eco-friendly wine production. Try a glass of riesling, which is made from the grape of New York state. 

7. Sociology: Chardonnay

Theresa Harvey

Sociology majors seek to understand all aspects of human social behavior, including which types of wine they like to drink when they're together. 2016 statistics show that Chardonnay is the most popular wine in America and most commonly drank at social gatherings. 

8. Psychology: Merlot

Theresa Harvey

Can wine actually make you happy? Studies have found that moderate wine intake can lead to a decreased risk of depression. Try a glass of  a red wine, like merlot, which have been shown to increase mood. 

9. Buisness: Cabernet Sauvignon

Theresa Harvey

As a business major, you might know that wine production is one of the biggest markets in the food and drink industry. This past year, the cabernet sauvignon grape took the cake as the top wine varietal worldwide. Try sipping on a glass as you read over the Wall Street Journal.

10. Mathematics: Pinot Gris

Theresa Harvey

Math majors typically like clean, clear-cut answers. Pinot Gris is a clean and crisp variety of wine that will definitely help clear up that multi-variable calculus problem you've been working on for hours. 

11. Communications: Syrah

Theresa Harvey

As a communications major, you bring life and excitement into the room as soon as you enter. Syrah is typically called a "spicy" variety of wine with flavors of blackberry, mint and black pepper. This full bodied wine is the perfect match to your energetic on-screen potential. 

12. Art/Art History: Red Blend

Theresa Harvey

The aromas, colors, and emotions that can be developed in many complex varieties of wine can be compared to works of art! Art majors will truly appreciate a Red Blend variety of wine which is typically composed of a combination of several types of grapes that allow the development of complex flavors. 

13. Biology: Frontenac Gris 

Wine at Saltus

khawkins04 on Flickr

The flavor of all varieties of wine comes down to nature, primarily the soil and climate in which the grapes are grown. Frontenac grapes are one of the hardiest varieties of grapes that can survive almost anything nature can throw at them. The wines made from these grapes are typically sweet white wines, perfect for a little pick me up after Friday afternoon lab. 

14. Chemistry: Champagne

Sparkling wine

tristanf on Flickr

Ever wondered what makes champagne so bubbly? Chemistry majors would be interested to the know that the bubbles in champagne come from dissolved carbon dioxide produced in an additional fermenting process of the wine. 

16. Education: Rosé

Theresa Harvey

Studies have found that drinking moderate amounts of wine can help us relax and think more clearly and thus make us smarter! Win! Of course that doesn't mean you should serve it to students... A glass of refreshing and sweet rosé pairs nicely with your creative and fun personality.  

17. Political Science: California Bordeaux

Theresa Harvey

Since the Reagan administration, ''all-American'' labels of wine have been served at the White House for state dinners and events. Typically, most wines come from the California region. Although a wide variety of grapes are grown in this region, Bordeaux varieties have been the most dominant. Get that presidential experience by pouring yourself a glass. 

18. English: Port

Theresa Harvey

As an English major, you're constantly presented with complex and enlightening discussions of literature. Port wine is a fortified wine variety typically consumed after dinner. It's know for it's rich and complex flavor, and of course it's distinct sweetness.