There seems to be a lot of confusion about both carbs and fruit these days: Are they healthy? Could you be eating too much? Fruits are carbs? Are you going to turn into a strawberry?

To far oversimplify the question, yes, fruit is primarily a carbohydrate-rich food group. But that isn't a bad thing.

Katherine Baker

Carbohydrates, by definition, are one of the three macronutrient groups from which your body gets energy (calories). And carbs are composed of sugars, starches (found in plants), and fiber.

Carbohydrates found in fruits are comprised of glucose, galactose, and fructose (three natural sugars).

Torey Walsh

They also contain fiber, which is technically a carbohydrate, and one that offers numerous health benefits including satiety (keepin' you full), powerful risk-reduction of many chronic diseases like heart disease.

So while fruit may be rich in carbs, it's also rich in nutrients, and shouldn't be avoided.

Katherine Baker

It's recommended healthy adults consume 2-3 cups a day, with a serving being something like a medium apple, banana, or a cup of melon or berries.

Of course, some fruits are higher in carbohydrate content than others. Particularly carb-rich fruits include mangos, grapes, bananas, apples, pears, dates and anything juiced or dried.

Torey Walsh

On the lower-carb end, there are fruits like strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, watermelon, pineapple, papayas, coconut, honeydew, cantaloupe, lemon and avocado (which yes, is technically a fruit). 

Fruits offer many benefits to the diet besides carbohydrates; they tend to be rich in vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and phytochemicals. Also, they tasty AF.

Kristine Mahan

Incorporating a variety of fruits—balanced with vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes—is a good place to start when you're striving for a healthful, delicious diet