Midterms are the worst. There are no "ifs", "ands", or "buts" about it— they suck. They say, "It shouldn't be that hard, all you have to do is study a little right?" Wrong. Midterm season can not only cause lack of sleep and over caffeination, but it can also cause some of us to stress eat. Which could mean stuffing our faces with whatever food is in our vicinity (or maybe that's just for me). 

This midterm season, I am determined to only fill my body with foods that are going to help me get that 4.0. I've complied a list of foods that will help ward off illness and keep your mind sharp all through #midtermszn.

Dark Chocolate

Rachel Tison

Not only is dark chocolate better for you than milk chocolate, it can also help you focus. It can also give you a boost of natural caffeine and can release endorphins, which make you feel good and help you destress.

Blueberries

Hannah Giardina

It has been proven that blueberries can improve concentration and memory skills because eating them stimulates blood flow and oxygen to your brain.

Fatty/Oily Fishes

Yonatan Soler

Although it may be hard to find in your on-campus dining halls, having a fatty/oily fish like salmon for lunch or dinner will not only keep you full for longer, but it can also help improve your concentration and boost your mood, which, let's be honest, during midterms is usually impossible. 

Nuts

Kirby Barth

Some nuts, like walnuts, almonds, and pistachios have the same magical powers as fish. Nuts have essential fatty acids that help your brain power at its highest level. They also help your alterness and ability to retain information.

#SpoonTip: Nuts have been proven to boost your energy so try them as a mid-studing snack.

Whole Grains

Sarah Silbiger

Refined carbs like white bread and pasta can leave you feeling sleepy, but whole grains can enhance your memory and boost your energy levels. Whole grain pasta or avocado toast on whole wheat bread are the perfect meal options to have before your all-nighter in the library. 

Leafy Greens

Santina Renzi

Leafy greens like spinach are full of antioxidants, which boost your brain power and memory skills and have also been proven to prevent memory loss. 

Apples

Spoon University

Eating apples while studying enhances the memory function of your brain, so memorizing all those flash cards will be a piece of cake. 

Avocados

Erin Thomas

Like salmon, avocados have the "good type of fat" that keep your brain and your heart healthy. They are also full of fiber, which keeps you fuller for longer.

#SpoonTip: Try avocado toast for breakfast the day of your exam so that you are full and focused.

Gum

Rachel Weitzman

Chewing gum while you're studying can help you focus more, gives you a boost of energy, and makes you more alert. Chewing gum during a test has also been shown to help test-takers focus more.